Jeanne Mackin's portrait of Europe in the years encompassing the Second World War is achingly beautiful and utterly mesmerizing, and her vividly drawn characters...come heartbreakingly alive in their obsessions, tragedies and triumphs. Sure to appeal...to anyone with a taste for impeccably researched and beautifully written historical fiction. - Jennifer Robson, author of Somewhere in France

THE SWEET BY AND BY

When Helen West is contracted to write a definitive essay on Maggie Fox, the founder of American Spiritualism, she begins to wonder if departed spirits do indeed return to comfort their loved ones. Maggie Fox made her living by convincing people that the dead spoke through her, and attracted to her seances Mrs. Abraham Lincoln and other nineteenth century celebrities. But is death the end, after all? Helen confronts these questions in a captivating, haunting novel that weaves together two stories that take place more than one hundred years apart.

"Jeanne Mackin has written a multilayered, multigenerational story of a spirited encounter with the spirit world." Nicholas Delbanco

Dreams of Empire
The year is 1799, a time of dreams and discovery. Fresh from his triumphs in Italy, Napoleon has crossed the Mediterranean Sea in search of new worlds to conquer. His journey takes him to Cairo, the center of the Corsican conqueror's hopes for new glory. Marguerite Verdier is an illustrator attached to the contingent of scholars accompanying Napoleon, searching for her own new conquests. From Scotland, Lord Elgin, the new British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, also sets sail for Egypt. What these travelers share is the desire for a new beginning - and a legendary treasure lost for thousands of years.

"A heady historical...rich in detail, well written and believable" Publisher's Weekly

"The author of The Frenchwoman again imaginatively samples French history and here constructs a witty, lightly satirical, entertaining amalgam of murder, greed, and revenge...a richly intelligent and charming spellbinder." Kirkus Reviews

The Queen's War

THE QUEEN'S WAR transports the reader to the royal court of Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, at Poitiers. Cast off by her husband, who now shares his bed with his young mistress, Rosamonde, Eleanor presides over her court of love. Aginst a rich tapestry of court intrique, Eleanor's sons go forth to make war against their father, Henry, and Eleanor herself watches and waits, knowing that her safety, her reputation, her very life, is at stake.

"a beautifully crafted story in the grand tradition of the classic historical novel" Beatrice Small, author of The Spitfire

THE FRENCHWOMAN

From her childhood in the slums of pre-revolutionary Paris, Julienne rises to find work as a seamstress, and is soon caught up in dangerous politics of Versailles and Marie Antoinette. Forced to flee France, she finds safety in Azilum, a wilderness town in Pennsylvania, with a community of exiles awaiting the arrival of their queen. Based on the history of the actual community of French Azilum, this novel portrays a woman's life of astonishing changes, extraordinary adventures, and no little tragedy.

"Fast-paced and impassioned" Kirkus reviews

"Rich in detail, from descriptions of food and attire to historical personages, this first novel is...entirely believable." Library Journal